Want to gain some weight?

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This page is intended for educational purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for consulting with a Medical Professional of your choice. Most of the contributors are not health care professionals; this page in part, is a collection of personal experiences, suggestions, and practical information mainly from myself and otherCOPD patients. Please remember when reading this that every Person with COPD responds differently; What is true for one COPD patient may or may not be true for you. Although every effort is made to keep this information accurate, This should NOT be used as an authoritative reference. 
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Avoiding Undernutrition
Nutrition in patients with COPD
APPLIED NUTRITIONAL INVESTIGATIONS
Nutritional Support and Modulation in the ICU
Search for Minerals,Vitamins, Amino Acids in any food
Calorie and Fat Gram Chart for 1000 Foods

Below are some sample daily high calorie intake menues -  for persons trying to gain weight.
Each day's food consisting of 6 small meals is approximately 2500calories.
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ABOUT THIS 2500 CALORIE MENU

Milk (whole) - 2 servings a day
fruit - 5 servings a day
vegetables - 1 serving a day
meat - 10 ounces a day
starches - 12 servings day
fat - 5 servings day
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It provides approximately: 40% carbohydrates. Which is normal daily requirements.
40% fat.................................
20% protein.........................
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For those co2  retainers, adjustments in this sample diet need to be made more toward less carborhydrates.
and more protein and fats.
It provides approximately: 20% carbohydrates. Which is normal daily requirements.
40% fat.................................
40% protein..........................
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For diabetics, adjustments need to be made to fit their specific needs.
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DO YOU DRINK ENOUGH LIQUIDS?

Drinking plenty of liquids helps keep your mucus thin and easy to cough up.  That makes breathing easy and aids
in preventing infections.  usually 4 or more 8 oz glasses of water is about right for most, but more is better if you can
manage it.  Also these four glasses should be water.  plus whatever other drinks you desire in your diet.
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This 'Olivija Shake' has 1000 to 1200 calories and will add even more to your daily intake
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Choose a shake, combine in electric blender or food processor, and blend until smooth.  If you cannot tolerate milk,
try one of the recipes using buttermilk or yogurt. (You can also substitute soy milk and/or tofu)
Olivija's regular shake..
8 oz half and half
1 envelope carnation instant breakfast 
2 scoops athlete's protein mix
2 tbsp powdered milk
2 scoops 'rich' ice cream 
Olivija's Sugar-free Shake
8 oz half and half
1 envelope carnation (sugar-free) instant breakfast 
2 scoops athlete's protein mix
2 tbsp powdered milk
2 scoops diebetic ice cream or frozen yogurt
OPTIONALS: peanut butter, banana or any other fruits, crushed candies, carame, butterscotch, sprinkles, ????
MORE SHAKES
Strawberry-Cheese Shake
(410 calories - 26 grams protein)
6-7 hulled strawberries
Dash of salt and dash of lemon juice
2 tbsp honey
2 tbsp powdered milk
half cup creamd cottage cheese
half cup cold whole milk
Pink Thick Shake
(400 calories - 20 grams protein)
1 pasteurized egg only or lightly poach
2 tbsp powdered milk
2 tbsp undiluted frozen concentrated fruit juice
half cup vanilia ice cream
half cup cold whole milk
Cream Cheese and Jelly Whirl
(370 calories - 13 grams of protein)
1 ox cream cheese
2 tbsp strawberry jelly
2 tbsp powdered milk
2/3 cup cold whole milk
Thick CherryShake
(450 calories - 15 grams protein)
2 tsp lemon juice 
2 tbsp powdered milk
1/3 cup cherry pie filling
2/3 cup vanilla ice cream
2/3 cup cold whole milk
Grapenog
(375 calories - 13 grams protein)
1 1/2 oz. frozen grape juice concentrate, unthawed
1 pasteurized egg only  or lightly poach
half tbsp light brown sugar
3/4 tsp. vanilla extract
3/4 cup whole milk
Chocolate - Banana Sipper
(430 calories - 15 grams protein)
half ripe banana
3 1/2 oz. evaporated milk
2 tbsp. chocolate syrup
2 tbsp honey
3/4 cup whole cold milk
prune - Orange Drink
(400 calories - 12 grams of protein)
4 Pitted prunes
2 tbsp powdered milk
2 tbsp frozen concentrated orange juice, thawed
3/4 cup cold whole milk
Raspberry Shake
(345 calories - 7.5 grams of protein)
2 1/2 oz. frozen red raspberries
fourth cup vanilla ice cream
1 tbsp honey
3/4 cup cold whole milk
Orange Cooler
(390 calories - 10 grams protein)
half pint orange sherbert
1 tbsp frozen orange juice concentrate, undiluted
1 cup buttermilk
Fruit Juice Shake
( 525 calories - 16 grams protein)
3/4 cup pineapple juice
1 pasteurized egg only or lightly poach
1 1/2 cup vanilla ice cream
Spicy Fruit Lowball
(205 calories - 14 grams protein)
2 1/2 oz. frozen peaches
2 tbsb powdered milk
1 tbsp light brown sugar
1/16 tbsp cinnamon
1 cup buttermilk
Sunburst
(350 calories - 13 grams protein)
half ripe banana
1 pasteurized egg only or lightly poach
2 tbsp honey
2 ice cubes1 cup pineapple juice
Prepared Eggnog
(370 calories - 16 grams protein)
1 cup prepared eggnog
fourth cup powdered milk
top with marachino cherry and nutmeg
Lemonade Shake
(575 calories - 13 grams protein)
half cup vanilla ice cream
1 pasteurized egg only or lightly poach
1 cup lime sherbert or vanilla ice cream
1 cup lemonade
Substitute fresh fruit for above mentioned frozen fruit -  and - half and half for the whole or fortified cold milk

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Carbohydrates.= 4 calories per gram =

 Fat.= 9 calories per gram =

Protein.= 4 calories per gram = important for growth, muscle and tissue repair and healing.
Consuming a wide variety of natural foods will help provide you with the more than 40 nutreients needed by your body to promote and maintain good health.
 
DAY 1
DAY 2
DAY 3
BREAKFAST
1cupwhole milk
1 cup oatmeal
butter - honey
raisains or other dried fruit 
1 cup yogurt
1 english muffin
butter jelly or cream cheese
1 cup whole milk
2 slices whole wheat toast
butter jelly or cream cheese
an egg
SNACK
banana
6 graham crackers
2 tablespoons of peanut butter
pear
4 pieces of french bread
2 ounces of cheese
apple 
8 ritz crackers
2 tablespoons peanut butter
LUNCH
Turkey sandwich
w/mayo
chips
egg salad sandwich 
lots of mayo
and chips
Toasted or grilled cheese 
Fritos
SNACK
1 cup mixed fruit
taco chips ot tortillos
with hummus
large orange
6 graham crackers with 
2 tablespoons of peanut butter
2 tangerines
2 oz cheese
6-12 crackers
DINNED
chicken breast
baked potato
half cup brocolli
butter and sour cream
pork chop
one cup rice
half cup spinach
butter gravy
large piece of meatloaf
1 cup noodles
half cup green beans
butter gravy
SNACK
half cup dried fruit
1 cup yogurt
6 vanilla waffers
small box raisins
1 cup whole milk
2 small blueberry muffins or 
similar muffins
half cup canned fruit
1 cup yogurt
mix granola in yogurt
 
DAY 4
DAY 5
DAY 6
BREAKFAST
1 cup yogurt
1 and a half cup dry ceral
2 hard boiled eggs
half cup whole milk
toasted waffle
butter and syrup
1 cup yogurt
2 toasted pancakes
butter and syrup
SNACK
20 ? grapes
8 vanilla waffers 
fourth cup nuts
6 dried appricots
fourth cup of cashews
1 cup blueberries
1 cup jello
vanilla waffers
LUNCH
ham and cheese on rye 
with mayo
chips
roast beef & cheese sandwich
cheese curls
chicken salad sandwich
chips
mixed nuts
SNACK
2 plums 
1 cup fruit juice
2 tablespoons of peanutbutter and graham crackers
pear
2 oz. cheese
8 ritz crackers
apple
2 oz. cheese
6 rye thins
DINNER
3 oz. fish
sweet potato
half cup mixed veggies
butter
Cheeseburger
mixed raw veggies
try colored bell peppers
large tossed salad with everything 
then crunch in 2 tacos
SNACK
1 peach
1 cup whole milk
2 cookies
1 cup cantalope
1 cup yogurt
cup of ice cream or
frozen yogurt 
6 ginger snaps
 
 DAY 7
 DAY 8
 DAY 9
BREAKFAST 
 1 cup whole milk
2 ggs
whole wheat toast
 1 cup yogurt
half cup granola mix
1 bagle with cream cheese
 1 cup whole milk
2 egg omlet
toast
 SNACK
 1 banana
2 tablespoon peanutbutter
ritz crackers
 trail mix
vanilla waffers
 1 apple 
2 oz. cheese
4 rye thin crackers
 LUNCH
 meat loaf sandwich
with mayo
chips
 sliced colored bell pepper, carrots, celery, cherry tomatoes
cheese veggie dip
 flour tortillo with humus
small salad with 
dressing
 SNACK
 fourth cup dried fruit 
2-3 cookies
1 cup fruit juice
 2 tablespoons peanut butter
6 graham crackers
 begal
cream cheese and jelly
half cup any canned fruit
 DINNER
 1 cup spegetti with meat sauce
spinich salad
sour dough or french bread
 fourt lb shrimp or scallops
snow peas, colored bell pepper
water chestnuts
assorted veggies
stir fry all and serve with
1 cup rice
 crock pot stew
with beef, potatoes,
carrots, onions
(tomatoes optional)
home made biscuits
(bisquick)
SNACK
1 kiwi fruit
1 cup whole milk
cup of ice cream or
frozen yogurt 
2 cookies
1 jello with fruit
2 cookies

Managing Your Nutritional Status

Use only unsturated oils such as olive oil, peanut oil, vegetable oil, etc.


Fortified milk is 2 tbsp powdered milk added to whole milk and adds 220 calories and 14 grams protein
1 cup half and half  adds 324 calories and 8 grams of protein
1 tbsp butter adds 100 calories
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 9 FOODS, 9 LIVES

 Prevention rounds up everyday foods with healing powers. Eat up Here!


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HINTS TO ADD PROTEIN AND/OR EXTRA CALORIES

Use powdered milk (2 tbsp) in 8 os glass of milk.

Powdered milk (2tbsp) can be added to soups sauces, gravies, casserole dishes, cereals (hot or cold) scrambled eggs,
     omlets, puddings, milk shakes, as well as baked products. also on yogurt and ice cream

Use whole milk or half and half or instead of water when making soups cereals, instant puddings,  coco or canned soup

  If you are lactose tolerant or unable to tolerate milk, try lactaid in the above.

  Use the following items on any and everything you can for extra calories. (1) cream cheese (2) sour cream (3) cream cheese (4) peanut butter (5) butter

  Add cold meats, fish or diced eggs to salads.

  Add diced or chopped meats to soups, sauces and casseroles.

  Meat based sauces to serve over pasta, vegetables, rice.

  Spread peanut Butter or cream cheese over  crackers, muffins, fruits and vegetables (such as apples, celery, bananas)

  Add shredded or melted cheese to salads, soups, potatoes sandwiches and vegetables.

  Add extra butter, cream cheese, or cream to cheese sauce or veggies.

  Spread cream cheese, peanut butter or dips into vegetables.

  Try diced fruits or fruits canned in syrup.

  Sweeten fresh fruit with honey

  Trouble chewing or swallowing fresh fruits or vegetables?? Try canned products or use a blender to create best texture.

  Top Ice Cream or Yogurt with fruit or mix fruit into milkshakes.

  Include rice, noodles, corn, dried peas and beans and potatoes to make hearty soups and stews.

  Use half and half in hot and cold cereal

   add extra butter to breads, vegetables, potatoes or cooked cereals.

   Use extra mayonnaise and salad dressings on salads and sandwiches.

   Use whipped cream on Pies, Jello, fruit, cake, pudding, hot chocolate and other dessert.

   Add marshmellows to hot chocolate made with fortified milk or half and half.

   Choose high calorie drinks like "Olivija's shake," chocolate milk or fruit aides rather than sodas, tea, coffee.

    Keep convient snack foods available such as nuts, trail mix and dried fruit.

    Consider nutritional supplements in addition to meals or as between-meal snacks.

    High protein, high calorie supplements are available in drug stores without a perscription.  The only one that is specific for COPD patients is Pulmocare

    Instant breakfast mixes can be added to milk, hot cereal and yogurt for added callories.

    Avacadoes have more calories than potatoes and they have lots of good oils. eat lots of them

    All items that are baked that call for water in receip, use instead milk fortified milf or half and half  or fruit juice with pulp.

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Early Satiety
Eat high calorie foods first
Eat smaller, more frequent meals
Limit liquids at meals
Drink liquids 1 hour after meals
Eat more cold foods (give less of a feeling of fullness than hot foods)
Add nonfat dried milk to mixed dishes, cereals, soups, and to fluid milk
to add calories and protein
Drink flavored milks or juices instead of calorie free
Bloating
Treat shortness of breath before meals to prevent air swallowing
Eat smaller, more frequent meals
Avoid rushed meals
Avoid carbonated beverages
Avoid gas forming foods that cause problems (i.e. dried beans, cabbage,
 onions, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.)
Review the types/dosages of medicines for adverse affect on food intake
Anorexia
Eat high calorie foods first.
Keep non-perishable favorite foods where they are easily seen and readily available
Have more frequent meals and snacks throughout the day.
Push yourself to eat.
Add fats to foods to increase their calorie content (i.e. butter, margarine,
mayonnaise, oil, peanut butter, gravies,  sauces, etc.)
Set an alarm clock or timer as a reminder to eat
Eat in front of the TV, while reading, etc.
Review the types/dosages of medicines for adverse affect on food intake
Dyspnea (SOB)
Rest before meals
Use bronchodilators before meals
Use secretion clearing interventions if needed before meals
Eat more slowly
Use pursed lip breathing between bites
Sit in the tripod position for meals
Have food prepared and within reach during periods of increased shortness of breath
Consider meal associated desaturation, refer for oxygen use evaluation if necessary
Fatigue
Rest before meals
Have food pre-prepared and readily available
Eat larger meals when less tired
Snack frequently
Use home delivered meals
Use frozen convenience dinners and entrees
Supplement food intake with commercial medical nutritional products if unable to access an adequate diet
Constipation
Maintain an adequate fluid intake (1-2 quarts/day)
 Increase grain intake as tolerated (6-11 servings/day)
Increase whole fruit and vegetable intake as tolerated (³ 5 servings/day)
Incorporate exercise as tolerated
Suggest a stool softener
Review the types/dosages of medicines that may adversely affect a bowel movement beverages
Dental Problems
Change the texture of foods (mash, chop, grind, puree) to ensure adequate food intake.
See your dentist yearly
Fix tooth problems that impair eating ability
Have dentures relined or refitted to maintain chewing ability
Review the types/dosages of medicines that might cause mouth or throat pain,
or make it hard to swallow


Adapted from: Donahoe M, Rogers RM. Nutritional assessment and support in
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clin Chest Med 11:499, 1990.

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SNACK IDEAS TO BOOST INTAKE:

Sandwiches with meat and/or cheese
Peanut butter on fruit or veggies
Vegetables or crackers with dip
Soup with grated cheese and crackers
Cottage cheese topped with fruit
Pound cake with fruit
Granola bars
Ice cream with toppings and/or fruit
Crackers with with peanut butter or cheese
Fruit bread with cream cheese or butter
Trail mix with dried fruit nuts and cereal
Pudding or pie with whipped cream
Buttered Popcorn with parmesan cheese
potato or macaroni salad
bowl of cereal
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DO YOU FEEL WEAK
If your illness has made you less active than in the past, your muscles may be getting smaller and weaker or atrophying.
To rebuild muscle, you need extra protein from milk products and meats and vitamins and minerals from fruits, vegetables and whole grains.  Weakness may also result from diuretics (water pills) that cause your body to loose potassium. You may want to think about adding more high potassium foods to your diet.  Foods high in potassium include:
Milk
Dried Fruit
Potatoes
Oranges
Bananas
Fresh Pineapple
Orange Juice 
Beef

HAS YOUR DOCTOR TOLD YOU TO CUT DOWN ON SALT?

Sometimes eating salt can cause your body to hold too much water.  Some people can get use to eating their food without saly by using other spices instead of salt and learn to like their food that way.  If you just have to have salt find a good salt substitute that is safe for You.  Add flavor to your food with herbs and spices: Use Thyme, Rosemary, basil, or sage in meats, fish, soups and sauses.  Vinegar or lemon in fish, vegetables and salads.  Caraway seeds, poppy seeds or sage in breads and pastas  Cinnamon or nutmeg in breads, fruits, pastries and puddings.
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GOOD FOR YOU FAST FOODS


Milk
Fresh Fruit
Fruit or vegetable juice
Cereals
Cheese
Applesauce
Eggs
Peanut butter
Yogurt
Dried Fruit
Salt free Tuna
Nuts
 
wholewheat toast
Avacadoes
Raw Vegetables

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HIGH CALORIE SOUP, CEREALS, AND MAIN DISHES

Crean of Vegetable Soup  - Makes 1 serving - 408 calories per serving

          1 Jar straines vegetables or 2 cup cooked, pureed vegetables
          1 tbsp butter
          2 tbsp powdered milk
          1 cup whole milk  or (1 cup half and half add 200 more calories)

Mix dry milk into whole milk or half and half.  Heat all ingredients together slowly.  Avoid overcooking.
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Quick Cheese Sauce  - Makes 12 cups - 350 calories - 8 grams protein per serving
1 can condedsed Cheddar Cheese soup
1/4 to 1/3 cup whole milk or (equal amounts half and half add 50 to 75 more calories)
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Crunchy Cereal  - Makes 15 1/2 cup servings - 280 calories - 8 grams protein per service
 
3 cups rolled oats, quick cooking
1 cup wheat germ
half cup coconut flakes and sunflower seeds
1 cup walnuts, pecans, peanuts, cashews or almonds coarsley chopped
1 cup raisins
half cup peanut oil
1/2 cup honey
2 tsp. vanilla

Preheat oven to 275 degree F (very slow)
Mix rolled oats wheat germ, coconut flakes and sunflower seeds, nuts and raisins in a large bowl.  Add peanut oil, honey
and vanilla. Spread mixture on a 15 x 10 x 1 inch baking pan.  Bake 1 hour.  Stirring every 15 minutes.  Cool.  Break up
any large lumps.  Store in airtight container.

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Creamed Tuna  - Makes three, 3/4 cup servings - 336 calories - 20 grams protein per serving.
 
1/8 tsp pepper
1 1/2 tbsp butter
2 tbsp powdered milk
3 tbsp flour
1 7 oz can oil-packed tuna
3/4 cup chicken broth
3/4 cup whole milk or half and half
half cup cooked peas
fourh cup chopped cashews (optional)

Melt butter in saucepan and stir in flour.  Mix powdered milk into whole milk and pour into flour-butter base.  Add seasonings and chichen broth.  Cook over moderate heat until smooth and thickened.  Add nuts, peas and tuna.  continue cooking until heated through.  Serve hot in pastery shells, over toast, biscuits or noodles.  Shreaded monaray Jack cheese is also a nice extra.

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Easy Tuna Casserole  -200 calories - 18 grams protein per serving - 4 servings
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1  seven oz can of oil packed tuna
2 hard boiled eggs
half cup green peas, cooked
half cup crumbled potato chips
fourth cup whole milk or half and half

Mix soup and milk together in a one quart casserole dish. Stir in tuna, eggs and peas. Bake at 350 degrees F for 25 minutes.
remove and sprinkle on crumbled potato chips and bake 5 more minutes.

* Variations in this cassarole could be shrimp, diced chichen or a seafood medley of scallop, crab and shrimp. don't forget you can also add 2 tablespoons powdered milk to whole milk for extra protein and calories.

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French Toast  - 441 calories - 11 grams protein per serving.
 
1 egg
2 slices bread whole wheat
2 tspb butter
2 tbsp half and half
1 tbsp honey 1/4 tsp salt

beat together the egg, salt,cream and honey.  Dip bread in mixture and grill in melted butter until browned on both sides.  Serve with butter and Syrup.

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Deviled Eggs
 
6 hard cooked eggs peeled
6 tbsp mayonnaise
1/2 tsp dry musrard
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
2 tbsp finely chopped sweet or dill pickle or olives (any of these 3 items optional)


Hot Diggity Dogs  -  290 calories - 12 grams protein

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Hot dogs or sausage
Individual cheese slices
refrigerator roll triangle roll-ups
tomato, colored bell peppers, onions

Wrap a hot dog or sausage with a slice of cheese and then in the rolled out roll triangle.  press dough to hold together while cooking. cook in oven acording to time on refrigerator roll packet, less 5 minutes. Remove from oven, and top with tomato pieces, green pepper and onions.  Place back in oven for last 5 minutes.

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HIGH CALORIE DESSERTS

Mini Cheesecakes - makes 24 cupcakes - 150 calories - 3 grams protein per serving.
 

3  eight oz packages of cream cheese
3 eggs
half cup honey
1 tbsp vanilla
ginger snaps or oreos or any round favorite cookie
use cupcake paper cups in muffin pan

Beat all ingredients until smooth.  Place cookie in bottom of each cupcake holder. Pour cream cheese mixture in each cup, over cookie.  Bake at 350 degrees F for 15 minutes.  Cool.   Add fruit compote or fresh fruit on top

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Rice puddin
 
1 3/4 cup whole milk
1 cup cooked rice
half cup raisins
2 eggs well beaten
3 tbsp powdered milk
1 tbsp butter
half tsp vanilla
fourth cup honey
fourth tsp salt

Mix whole milk with powdered milk.  mix milk, rice and butter in saucepan.  Heat slowly until scalding.  Mix salt, honey, raisins, vanilla and beaten eggs. slowly combine and pour into dessertdishes.  serve with nutmeg and whipped cream

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Extra Rich Pudding - four, two cup servings - 279 calories - 5 grams protein per serving.
 
3/4 cup whole milk
1 cup vanilla ice cream
1 package (4 serving size) instant pudding - Any Flavor
2 tbsp dry skim milk

Soften ice cream.  Mix powdered milk with whole milk.  Throughly blend milk and ice cream in a bowl.  Add pudding mix and beat slowly with rotary beater or at low speed with electric mixer until blended, about one minute. (optional pecans, stir in at this point if desired)  Pour into cups and chill until set about three hours.  Serve with whipped cream.

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CROCKPOT RECIPES - http://www.cookingcache.com/crockpot.html

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MORE EVIDENCE THAT YOGURT BENEFITS IMMUNE SYSTEM
 
NEW YORK, Mar 29 (Reuters Health) -- Yogurt has long been touted as the ultimate health food, purportedly contributing to better digestion, improved nutrition, reduced cholesterol, and protection from cancer. According to two recent reports, there may indeed be substance to some of these claims but additional research is needed to confirm the benefits of yogurt consumption.

Writing in the current issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Simin Nikbin Meydani of Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, and Woel-Kyu Ha of the Maeil Dairy Industry Co., in Seoul, South Korea, point out that previous studies of yogurt and the immune system have been limited by flaws in study design. Nonetheless, the researchers conclude that "these studies (do) provide a strong rationale for the hypothesis" that eating yogurt can enhance the immune system, particularly among the elderly.

Since most earlier yogurt studies have been conducted on animals, Meydani and Ha call for human studies that randomly assign participants to groups that do and do not eat yogurt, follow them for longer periods of time, and monitor measures of immune response carefully.

The current issue of the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition offers just such a study. Dr. H.S. Gill of Massey University, New Zealand, and colleagues from the Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. Johns, Canada, compared two groups of volunteers, all at least 60 years old. Twelve people were randomly assigned to drink 180 milliliters (6 ounces) of low-fat, low-lactose milk twice a day, and 13 were given the same milk supplemented with a strain of bacteria derived from yogurt.

Participants drank either the plain milk or the bacteria-enhanced milk for 6 weeks. At the conclusion of the study and at points 3, 6, and 12 weeks later, the researchers used blood tests to measure several determinants of natural immune function.

The investigators report that those who received the bacteria-containing milk demonstrated enhanced immune activity on several measures, suggesting that the yogurt culture may "enhance a subject's capacity to fight microbial infection," and possibly improve the immune system's ability to fight viruses and cancer cells.

Gill's team notes that the subjects who just drank milk also showed slight immune enhancement, and conclude that not only can yogurt cultures be added to milk to improve immune response, but that milk itself "can further enhance the immune-enhancing potential of a dairy-based product."

The Canadian-New Zealand researchers agree with their US-Korean colleagues that further clinical studies are indicated to verify and extend these findings.

SOURCE: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
2000;71:861-872; European Journal of Clinical
Nutrition 2000;54:263-267.

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Toxins and cellular waste are acidic. So is most of the food you eat.(Fresh fruits and vegetables, almonds and a few other foods are alkaline.) Soft drinks, especially colas, are highly acidic.

The resulting over-acidic body does not detoxify well because blood must have a neutral pH. To prevent it from becoming acidic, the body pulls waste and toxins from the blood and deposits them in cells. To bring the blood back to a more neutral pH. Toxins also will not be released from the cells to be removed from the body if the blood is too acidic. Resulting in toxic cells which are not healthy.

Many Japanese doctors and researchers feel that being overly acidic is a fundamental cause of aging and disease. In the case of pulmonary diseases, it could well be a reason why your body was not able to eliminate the environmental toxin or whatever is causing the pulmonary condition. The body had too much acidity to deal with so it shifted the toxins into cells to normalize blood pH. Essentially storing poisons in your cells.

What the Japanese recommend is to consume foods and drink that are highly alkaline. Your body then must get acids into to bloodstream to keep it at a neutral pH. So it starts detoxifying. Releasing toxins stored up in your cells into the bloodstream. Which can then be removed from your body by the kidneys.

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ALL ABOUT ONIONS
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Water

1. 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated. (Likely applies to half the world's population)
2. In 37% of Americans, the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is oftenmistaken for hunger.
3. Even MILD dehydration will slow down one's metabolism as much as 3%.
4. One glass of water will shut down midnight hunger pangs for almost 100% of the dieters studied in a U-Washington study.
5. Lack of water, the #1 trigger of daytime fatigue.
6. Preliminary research indicates that 8-10 glasses of water a day could significantly ease back and joint pain for up to 80% of sufferers.
7. A mere 2% drop in body water can trigger fuzzy short-term memory, trouble with basic math, and difficulty focusing on the computer screen or on a printed page.
8. Drinking 5 glasses of water daily decreases the risk of colon cancer by 45%, plus it can slash the risk of breast cancer by 79%, and one is 50% less likely to develop bladder cancer.

Are you drinking the amount of water you should every day?

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To build muscle the body needs protein!!!!!!


Nutritional evaluation of protein foods
The Vegetarian Bodybuilder
Protein Supplements Vs. Protein Foods
High Protein Foods
TYPES OF HIGH PROTEIN FOODS
Protein Primer
Osteoporosis - The Silent Bone Thinner
Diet Tips for Older Americans with lung disease
Dietitians to provide doctors with nutritional guide
Wise traditions in farm, food and healing arts

 
 
 

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Safty of U.S. Tap Water
 The Importance of Water
Naturopathic Medicine
Water
Personality Test
Workbook and Manual
WHY DRINK WATER?
 
What kinds of symptoms result from drinking too little water? Most commonly I see constipation, dry and itchy skin, acne, nose bleeds, repeated urinary tract infections, dry and unproductive coughs, constant sneezing, sinus pressure and headaches.

You might ask how a lack of water intake can cause this wide array of symptoms. Water is required by every cell in the body as nourishment and to remove wastes. When water becomes scarce, the body tries to limit the amount it loses through breathing, mucous production, urination, perspiration and bowel movements.

Several cups of water are lost daily through breathing because the lungs require humid air to do their work. In the winter when drier air prevails outside and heating systems (especially forced hot air and wood stoves) dry out the air inside, even more water is lost. It is estimated that on an average day in the fall, 3-4 cups of water are lost through breathing. On a cold, dry winter day as much as 2-3 more cups of water may be lost in this way. The body has to moisturize the air before it reaches the lungs and does so through the mucous membranes lining the nasal passages and the bronchi. As available fluid decreases, the mucous lining becomes drier. This in turn irritates the lungs, causing them to become more reactive to dust, mold particles, cigarette smoke and other irritants, and less resistant to viruses and bacteria. The result: dry cough and bronchitis.

The mucous membranes of our lungs and gut are an important component of our resistance to disease. They provide an effective barrier to bacteria, viruses and pollutants when intact. But a number of substances (such as aspirin) are known to harm this barrier. What is less well known is that a lack of water in the body makes the all important mucous less viscous and can cause constipation, irritable bowel syndrome and a slowed movement of the bowels contents. These problems in turn increase ones risk of other long term disease including hemorrhoids and colon cancer. The mucous lining in the sinus passages is similarly vital as a defense against disease. When it becomes drier, sinusitis, nose bleeds and allergic symptoms worsen.

Obviously, we all lose some water through urination and urination is required for the removal of various toxins from the body. When fluid volume is diminished, the ability of the body to remove toxins through urination is also diminished. It is a comon misunderstanding that the more water we drink, the harder it is on the kidneys. In fact, except for people with some uncommon kidney problems, the opposite is true. Water soluble toxins cannot be easily removed through the bowels, especially when a lack of water also causes constipation. These toxins then must be eliminated in other ways such as through the skin. The increase in body toxin levels can cause headaches and fatigue. The attempt by the body to remove excess levels of unwanted chemicals through the skin can cause acne and will aggravate eczema.

The easy solution to all these problems is to drink more water. Coffee, tea and soda all contain caffeine which is a known diuretic and will actually accentuate the symptoms of fluid loss. Fruit juices are more concentrated in sugar than your body's fluids and so the body will attempt to dilute them in the gut thereby causing a loss of water from other areas of the body. In the dry, hot air of winter and very hot days of summer, drink at least 10 glasses of water daily for optimal health. During the spring and fall, 8 glasses will suffice for most people, although those with inhalant allergies do best to drink as much water as possible. Pregnant women need to drink at least 50% more water daily than they would while not pregnant. People who exercise vigorously should add one glass of water for each 30 minutes of exercise. Herbal teas and diluted fruit juices (1/3 fruit juice to 2/3 water) can be substituted for some of the water. Drink one extra glass of water for each cup of coffee or black tea you have. Humidifying the air in the winter will help reduce water loss, but be careful to clean humidifiers daily to discourage bacteria or mold build up.

What type of water is best? Activated carbon or charcoal filtered water is probably the least expensive way to drink 'safe' water. The carbon filter removes most of the carcinogens and bacteria commonly found in drinking water. These filters are often very inexpensive and can be found in almost any department store. Distilled water has had all the metals (both harmful and helpful) removed. None of the flourinated and chlorinated hydrocarbons (coming from combining fertilizers and pesticides with flouride and chlorine) are removed. It is these hydrocarbons which are linked with the most health problems. Bottled spring waters may be healthy, but they are not yet required to be analyzed for chemical and bacterial levels.

Water can be a miracle cure for many common ailments. Try drinking some now and see if you don't feel better!

Dr. Jennifer Brett


 
 


 
 
 
 
 

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Last edited on 12-15-2002